The Natives Are Restless

The ancient Hawaiian art of hula is thriving in cities all over the country and the world. In The Natives Are Restless: A San Francisco dance master takes hula into the 21st century, journalist Constance Hale presents the largely untold story of the dance tradition, using the twin keyholes of Kumu Patrick Makuakāne (a Hawaii-born, San Francisco–based hula master), and his 350-person arts organization (Nā Lei Hulu i ka Wēkiu). In the background, she weaves the poignant story of an ancient people and the resilience of their culture. In the foreground, she tells the story of an electrifying new form of hula that has emerged from a restless generation of artists like Makuakāne. The crisp narrative is complemented by full-color photographs and illustrations.

‘Iwalani’s Tree

On the North Shore of O‘ahu, a girl named ‘Iwalani lives with her family not far from Ka‘ena Point, at the island’s westernmost tip. ‘Iwalani likes to wander down the beach to a place where an ironwood tree stands as a windbreak—just on the spot where the land becomes sand. The tree is ‘Iwalani’s playground, jungle gym, secret friend, and wise elder, all in one. From the ironwood she learns about the cycles of nature, the promise of imaginative freedom, and the power of dreams.

The book is illustrated by Kathleen Peterson, who used pastels on sanded paper. It is published by BeachHouse.